Seven Quality Tools – Check Sheet

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A check sheet can be used for collecting both quantitative and qualitative data. When used to collect qualitative data, a check sheet collects data in the form of checkmarks. It indicates how many times a particular value has occurred. That way, it lets you see trends in the data easily.

What is a Check Sheet?

The check sheet is one of the Seven Basic Quality Tools.

The purpose of a check sheet is to collect data.

For example, say that your production line operator wanted to see what defects were being produced most frequently. He would set up a list of all the defects produced in the production line and then use a check sheet to record the type of defect whenever one occurs.

That way, by the end of the day, the operator can visually see which type of defects are more frequently occurring. Later on, using the Pareto Chart, the operator can identify the most occurring type of defects.

What is a Check Sheet Used for?

Check sheets are used for data collection. For example, they can help you in:

  • - Recording the number of defects by type
  • - Recording the locations of defects
  • - Recording the number of safety incidences

 

What Are the Good Features of a Check Sheet?

Quality practitioners use a Check Sheet to collect data. The following five features make a check sheet a valuable tool for data collection.

1. Keeps You Organized

A check sheet is a handy tool for keeping all your data organized.

2. Can Be Used To Record Results

A check sheet is particularly useful for recording or collecting data as the event happens.

3. Easy to Understand and Interpret it

It is straightforward to use and interpret the results.

4. A Good Starting Point for the Process Improvement

You can use a check sheet to collect data that can be used for further analysis using tools such as a Pareto Chart.

Tools for creating a Check Sheet

Unlike many other quality tools, this one is straightforward and basic. It does not require software to use this tool.

1. Manual: Using a pen and paper: In most cases, this method will work well unless the data volume is high.

2. Microsoft Excel: If the data volume is high and it is not practical to collect it manually, you need some software support. If the data is collected automatically in high volume, you can use a data analysis tool (such as Excel) to compile or group the data into various categories. The Pivot table function of Excel is quite helpful in such situations.

 

Conclusion

A check sheet can be used to collect quantitative (e.g. measurements) or qualitative data(e.g. counts).

Conclusion

A check sheet can be used to collect quantitative (e.g. measurements) or qualitative data(e.g. counts).


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